Thursday, November 19, 2009

Pork Wellington



Personally I love pork, and I especially love Berkshire (Karabuta) pork. You can eat this as sashimi in Japan, and you can prepare it rare or medium rare. Yes, pork can be served raw, if you treat the pigs well when they were alive. The puff pastry I used here is organic and found in frozen sections at Whole Foods. I learned this dish from Dirty Apron and I have since been wrapping various meats using puff pastry. This dish is a little more labour intensive, and I only prepare this dish a few times.

Ingredients:
Wellington

  • 2 Pork Tenderloin (3 oz each center cut)
  • 1 Small square sheet puff pastry (6x6 inch)
  • 1 tsp Grainy Mustard
  • 2 Springs Thyme (finely chopped)
  • 1 Egg (egg wash)
  • Olive oil, flour, salt, pepper
Sauce
  • 80ml White Wine
  • 80ml Chicken Stock
  • 80ml Heavy Cream (or cashew cream)
  • 2 tsp Grainy Mustard
  • ½ tbsp Chives (sliced)
  • ½ shallot (finely diced)
  • 1 Clove of Garlic (finely chopped)
  • Salt and Pepper


Instruction:
Wellington

1. Preheat Oven 450˚F
2. Season pork on all side with sale and pepper
3. Heat a pan in high heat and sear the pork on all side in olive oil
4. Remove the pork, but keep the pan for the sauce
5. In a small bowl, add mustard, thyme, pork and cover the pork on all side with the mustard.
6. Brush the pasty with egg wash
7. Place pork at the bottom center of the sheet and wrap the pastry over the tenderloin to cover, tucking ends under.
8. Bake for 10 minutes or until the pork is at 140˚F and pastry is brown.

Sauce
1. Using the pan from the pork, saute the shallot and garlic (add more oil if necessary).
2. Add white wine and chicken stock, and reduce to ¼ of the liquid.
3. Reduce heat and add cream and mustard. Cook until thickened.
4. Add chives before serving.

The pork is marinated overnight and cooked to medium rare. Almost forgot that you got to trim all visible fat off the pork (otherwise the fat would make the pastry soggy). I think it would pair well with a light to medium bodied red with low tannin.

Christine on Foodista

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